Millet Wine: Aboriginal Homemade Wine

Millet Wine
Aboriginal Millet Wine

Millet Wine Of Taiwan

Millet Wine, a cultural drink of Taiwan, has left the mountains and toured the world. What is it? What makes it so special? Let’s begin at the beginning…..

Millet Wine is always homemade and was used as an offering to the gods and spirits that the Aboriginal people followed. You would always see it at any important milestone in someone’s life. These milestones could be festivals, birth of a new baby, or weddings. These were all considered spiritual events and required a quality offering of millet wine. Tribal chiefs would always be present to offer these offerings, and to bless the people. These were happy occasions and dancing often would follow.

So what were these wines? Millet wine is totally homemade and each one is unique. No two ever taste exactly the same. First the sticky rice is soaked in water and then put into a wooden steamer and steamed. It is then cooled and put in cold water to cool more. Later the rice is mixed with a rice yeast. It is then left to stand for four or five days. Then it is put in a fine mesh sieve and the alcohol drains off from the rice into a pot or other vessel. This is the story of the humble beginnings of millet wine and it is now loved by many throughout the island and even overseas.

Millet wine has now hit the world commercial market and is being well received.  The biggest exporter of Taiwan’s indigenous millet wine is Ma La Sun Liquor. It is all natural, and is bringing Taiwan to the world. It may be on a shelf near you!

So on your next trip to Taiwan, have a small glass of millet wine and enjoy the work of many hands in the Aboriginal Community. Take time to discover the many special dishes that each cuisine has to offer. Each Aboriginal Tribe has their own cuisine. It is delicious! It is, Taiwanese!

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